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The Importance of Visual Arts

Arts education helps students with a variety of skills

Every student deserves to learn art, but with education cutbacks, arts education is often the first to go from public education. Visual literacy plays such an important role in our lives, that many kids in kindergarten through eighth grade are missing out due to educators’ choices to cut out art from the curriculum.

“Arts education fosters bright, creative, and socially engaged students who will grow up to be our next leaders, parents, teachers, artists, and engineers,” states Jane Chu, National Endowment for the Arts. “Their innovative ideas will shape industries; their creative thinking will find out-of-the-box solutions for a global society, and will provide students with a way to understand themselves, and have a sense of belonging.”

Arts can help students develop self esteem and give them an outlet for creative safe expression. Kids also learn to communicate, explore, imagine, and have a cultural and historical understanding through visual arts. Art classes allow for cognitive development as well, so when they’re removed from school, the students ultimately suffer.

Research confirms that arts education strengthens students’ problem-solving and critical thinking skills. It also adds to overall academic achievement, school success and job preparation. Art classes are often motivation for students to attend to school and enjoy education.

Microsoft co-founder Paul G. Allen understands the importance of arts education. He says, “In my own philanthropy and business endeavors, I have seen the critical role that the arts play in stimulating creativity and in developing vital communities….the arts have a crucial impact on our economy and are an important catalyst for learning, discovery, and achievement in our country.”

Whether arts are taught in school, home or in the community, they are super important and should never be taken away from our youth. Even college students benefit as it helps them prepare for life after college.

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